The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935

The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935

Author: James D. Anderson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

Published: 2010-01-27

Total Pages: 383

ISBN-13: 0807898880

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James Anderson critically reinterprets the history of southern black education from Reconstruction to the Great Depression. By placing black schooling within a political, cultural, and economic context, he offers fresh insights into black commitment to education, the peculiar significance of Tuskegee Institute, and the conflicting goals of various philanthropic groups, among other matters. Initially, ex-slaves attempted to create an educational system that would support and extend their emancipation, but their children were pushed into a system of industrial education that presupposed black political and economic subordination. This conception of education and social order--supported by northern industrial philanthropists, some black educators, and most southern school officials--conflicted with the aspirations of ex-slaves and their descendants, resulting at the turn of the century in a bitter national debate over the purposes of black education. Because blacks lacked economic and political power, white elites were able to control the structure and content of black elementary, secondary, normal, and college education during the first third of the twentieth century. Nonetheless, blacks persisted in their struggle to develop an educational system in accordance with their own needs and desires.


The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935

The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935

Author: James D. Anderson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

Published: 1988

Total Pages: 392

ISBN-13:

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A critical reinterpretation from reconstruction to the Great Depression. Places black schooling within a political, cultural, and economic context; considers black commitment to education; the peculiar significance of Tuskegee Institute; conflicting goals of various philanthropic groups. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Schooling the Freed People

Schooling the Freed People

Author: Ronald E. Butchart

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

Published: 2010-09-27

Total Pages: 336

ISBN-13: 9780807899342

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Conventional wisdom holds that freedmen's education was largely the work of privileged, single white northern women motivated by evangelical beliefs and abolitionism. Backed by pathbreaking research, Ronald E. Butchart's Schooling the Freed People shatters this notion. The most comprehensive quantitative study of the origins of black education in freedom ever undertaken, this definitive book on freedmen's teachers in the South is an outstanding contribution to social history and our understanding of African American education.


Their Highest Potential

Their Highest Potential

Author: Vanessa Siddle Walker

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

Published: 2000-11-09

Total Pages: 276

ISBN-13: 9780807866191

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African American schools in the segregated South faced enormous obstacles in educating their students. But some of these schools succeeded in providing nurturing educational environments in spite of the injustices of segregation. Vanessa Siddle Walker tells the story of one such school in rural North Carolina, the Caswell County Training School, which operated from 1934 to 1969. She focuses especially on the importance of dedicated teachers and the principal, who believed their jobs extended well beyond the classroom, and on the community's parents, who worked hard to support the school. According to Walker, the relationship between school and community was mutually dependent. Parents sacrificed financially to meet the school's needs, and teachers and administrators put in extra time for professional development, specialized student assistance, and home visits. The result was a school that placed the needs of African American students at the center of its mission, which was in turn shared by the community. Walker concludes that the experience of CCTS captures a segment of the history of African Americans in segregated schools that has been overlooked and that provides important context for the ongoing debate about how best to educate African American children. African American History/Education/North Carolina


Self-Taught

Self-Taught

Author: Heather Andrea Williams

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

Published: 2009-06-03

Total Pages: 322

ISBN-13: 1442995408

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Dangerous Donations

Dangerous Donations

Author: Eric Anderson

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

Published: 1999

Total Pages: 263

ISBN-13: 0826264166

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Dangerous Donations explores the important limitations on the power of these foundations and their agents. The northern philanthropies had to move cautiously and conservatively, seeking the cooperation of southern whites whenever possible. They believed African Americans could not be excluded from education and must be prepared for productive participation in the South -- whatever its social system -- for the safety of the region and the nation as a whole. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.


Twenty-First-Century Jim Crow Schools

Twenty-First-Century Jim Crow Schools

Author: Raynard Sanders

Publisher: Beacon Press

Published: 2018-04-03

Total Pages: 160

ISBN-13: 0807076074

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How charter schools have taken hold in three cities—and why parents, teachers, and community members are fighting back Charter schools once promised a path towards educational equity, but as the authors of this powerful volume show, market-driven education reforms have instead boldly reestablished a tiered public school system that segregates students by race and class. Examining the rise of charters in New Orleans, Chicago, and New York, authors Raynard Sanders, David Stovall, and Terrenda White show how charters—private institutions, usually set in poor or working-class African American and Latinx communities—promote competition instead of collaboration and are driven chiefly by financial interests. Sanders, Stovall, and White also reveal how corporate charters position themselves as “public” to secure tax money but exploit their private status to hide data about enrollment and salaries, using misleading information to promote false narratives of student success. In addition to showing how charter school expansion can deprive students of a quality education, the authors document several other lasting consequences of charter school expansion: • the displacement of experienced African American teachers • the rise of a rigid, militarized pedagogy such as SLANT • the purposeful starvation of district schools • and the loss of community control and oversight A revealing and illuminating look at one of the greatest threats to public education, Twenty-First-Century Jim Crow Schools explores how charter schools have shaped the educational landscape and why parents, teachers, and community members are fighting back.


Educational Reconstruction

Educational Reconstruction

Author: Hilary Green

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

Published: 2016-04-01

Total Pages: 272

ISBN-13: 0823270130

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Tracing the first two decades of state-funded African American schools, Educational Reconstruction addresses the ways in which black Richmonders, black Mobilians, and their white allies created, developed, and sustained a system of African American schools following the Civil War. Hilary Green proposes a new chronology in understanding postwar African American education, examining how urban African Americans demanded quality public schools from their new city and state partners. Revealing the significant gains made after the departure of the Freedmen’s Bureau, this study reevaluates African American higher education in terms of developing a cadre of public school educator-activists and highlights the centrality of urban African American protest in shaping educational decisions and policies in their respective cities and states.


Shelter in a Time of Storm

Shelter in a Time of Storm

Author: Jelani M. Favors

Publisher: UNC Press Books

Published: 2019-02-08

Total Pages: 367

ISBN-13: 1469648342

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2020 Museum of African American History Stone Book Award 2020 Lillian Smith Book Award Finalist, 2020 Pauli Murray Book Prize For generations, historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have been essential institutions for the African American community. Their nurturing environments not only provided educational advancement but also catalyzed the Black freedom struggle, forever altering the political destiny of the United States. In this book, Jelani M. Favors offers a history of HBCUs from the 1837 founding of Cheyney State University to the present, told through the lens of how they fostered student activism. Favors chronicles the development and significance of HBCUs through stories from institutions such as Cheyney State University, Tougaloo College, Bennett College, Alabama State University, Jackson State University, Southern University, and North Carolina A&T. He demonstrates how HBCUs became a refuge during the oppression of the Jim Crow era and illustrates the central role their campus communities played during the civil rights and Black Power movements. Throughout this definitive history of how HBCUs became a vital seedbed for politicians, community leaders, reformers, and activists, Favors emphasizes what he calls an unwritten "second curriculum" at HBCUs, one that offered students a grounding in idealism, racial consciousness, and cultural nationalism.