The Reign of Heraclius (610-641)

The Reign of Heraclius (610-641)

Author: G. J. Reinink

Publisher: Peeters Publishers

Published: 2002

Total Pages: 338

ISBN-13: 9789042912281

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This volume includes the thirteen papers which were presented during the workshop The Reign of Heraclius: Crisis and Confrontation, which took place from 19 to 21 April 2001 at the University of Groningen. The long reign of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius (610-641) saw drastic political changes: the conquest of the eastern provinces of the empire by the Persians (603-620), Heraclius' counter-offensive and recovery of these territories (622-628), and the definitive loss of almost the whole Byzantine east in the 630s and early 640s to the Muslim Arabs. Did these historical events cause significant changes in the administrative, political, military and ecclesiastical structures and institutions of the empire? And if so, how did they affect imperial ideology and propaganda and the range of ideas concerning the empire and the emperor which circulated in the different religious communities? In the contributions presented in this book these and other questions are discussed by outstanding scholars of Byzantine history and culture, Eastern Christianity, Judaism and Islam.


Fighting Emperors of Byzantium

Fighting Emperors of Byzantium

Author: John Carr

Publisher: Pen and Sword

Published: 2015-04-30

Total Pages: 298

ISBN-13: 1783831162

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The Eastern Roman or 'Byzantine' Empire had to fight for survival throughout its long history so military ability was a prime requisite for a successful Emperor. John Carr concentrates on the personal and military histories of the more capable war fighters to occupy the imperial throne at Constantinople. They include men like it's founder Constantine I , Julian, Theodosius, Justinian, Heraclius, Leo I, Leo III, Basil I, Basil II (the Bulgar-slayer), Romanus IV Diogenes, Isaac Angelus, and Constantine XI. ??Byzantium's emperors, and the military establishment they created and maintained, can be credited with preserving Rome's cultural legacy and, from the seventh century, forming a bulwark of Christendom against aggressive Islamic expansion. For this the empire's military organization had to be of a high order, a continuation of Roman discipline and skill adapted to new methods of warfare. Thus was the Empire, under the leadership of its fighting emperors, able to endure for almost a thousand years after the fall of Rome.


The Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire c.500-1492

The Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire c.500-1492

Author: Jonathan Shepard

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Published: 2019-06-30

Total Pages: 1228

ISBN-13: 9781107685871

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Byzantium lasted a thousand years, ruled to the end by self-styled 'emperors of the Romans'. It underwent kaleidoscopic territorial and structural changes, yet recovered repeatedly from disaster: even after the near-impregnable Constantinople fell in 1204, variant forms of the empire reconstituted themselves. The Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire c.500-1492 tells the story, tracing political and military events, religious controversies and economic change. It offers clear, authoritative chapters on the main events and periods, with more detailed chapters on outlying regions and neighbouring societies and powers of Byzantium. With aids such as maps, a glossary, an alternative place-name table and references to English translations of sources, it will be valuable as an introduction. However, it also offers stimulating new approaches and important findings, making it essential reading for postgraduates and for specialists. The revised paperback edition contains a new preface by the editor and will offer an invaluable companion to survey courses in Byzantine history.


Short History

Short History

Author: Saint Nicephorus (Patriarch of Constantinople.)

Publisher: Dumbarton Oaks

Published: 1990

Total Pages: 268

ISBN-13: 9780884021841

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Byzantium Viewed by the Arabs

Byzantium Viewed by the Arabs

Author: Nadia Maria El-Cheikh

Publisher: Harvard CMES

Published: 2004

Total Pages: 292

ISBN-13: 9780932885302

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This book studies the Arabic-Islamic view of Byzantium, tracing the Byzantine image as it evolved through centuries of warfare, contact, and exchanges. Including previously inaccessible material on the Arabic textual tradition on Byzantium, this investigation shows the significance of Byzantium to the Arab Muslim establishment and their appreciation of various facets of Byzantine culture and civilization. The Arabic-Islamic representation of the Byzantine Empire stretching from the reference to Byzantium in the Qur'an until the fall of Constantinople in 1453 is considered in terms of a few salient themes. The image of Byzantium reveals itself to be complex, non-monolithic, and self-referential. Formulating an alternative appreciation to the politics of confrontation and hostility that so often underlies scholarly discourse on Muslim-Byzantine relations, this book presents the schemes developed by medieval authors to reinterpret aspects of their own history, their own self-definition, and their own view of the world.


Byzantium and Islam

Byzantium and Islam

Author: Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Published: 2012

Total Pages: 354

ISBN-13: 1588394573

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This magnificent volume explores the epochal transformations and unexpected continuities in the Byzantine Empire from the 7th to the 9th century. At the beginning of the 7th century, the Empire's southern provinces, the vibrant, diverse areas of North Africa and the eastern Mediterranean, were at the crossroads of exchanges reaching from Spain to China. These regions experienced historic upheavals when their Christian and Jewish communities encountered the emerging Islamic world, and by the 9th century, an unprecedented cross- fertilization of cultures had taken place. This extraordinary age is brought vividly to life in insightful contributions by leading international scholars, accompanied by sumptuous illustrations of the period's most notable arts and artifacts. Resplendent images of authority, religion, and trade—embodied in precious metals, brilliant textiles, fine ivories, elaborate mosaics, manuscripts, and icons, many of them never before published— highlight the dynamic dialogue between the rich array of Byzantine styles and the newly forming Islamic aesthetic. With its masterful exploration of two centuries that would shape the emerging medieval world, this illuminating publication provides a unique interpretation of a period that still resonates today.


Byzantine Art and Diplomacy in an Age of Decline

Byzantine Art and Diplomacy in an Age of Decline

Author: Cecily J. Hilsdale

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Published: 2014-02-20

Total Pages: 425

ISBN-13: 1107033306

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Questions how political decline refigures the visual culture of empire by examining the imperial image and the gift in later Byzantium (1261-1453). Provides a more nuanced account of medieval artistic cultural exchange that considers the temporal dimensions of power and the changing fates of empires.