Black Religious Activism

Black Religious Activism

Author: Richard A. Thomas

Publisher:

Published: 2024-03-31

Total Pages: 0

ISBN-13: 1440870217

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A chronology, an overview essay, and alphabetically arranged reference entries explore the background and contemporary significance of black religious activism in the United States. In 1787, Richard Allen and Absalom Jones left the predominantly white St. George Methodist Episcopal Church to protest the racism and discrimination they faced. A few years later, both men would create their own African American Christian denominations to meet the political and spiritual needs of black communities. Black leaders created countless religious organization over the next two hundred years to meet those same needs. Black religious communities ranging from mega churches to Black Lives Matter continue to play an important role in politics. This book examines the background and significance of black religious activism in the United States. The book begins with an overview of black religious activism. A chronology then profiles key events related to black religious activism. Roughly 50 alphabetically arranged reference entries follow. These provide objective, fundamental information about people, organizations, events, and other topics related to black religious activism, with an emphasis on modern concerns. Each entry provides cross-references and suggestions for further reading. The volume closes with a selected, annotated bibliography of the most important broad works on black religious activism. An overview essay surveys the background and present-day significance of black religious activism in the United States A chronology highlights key events related to black religious activism Alphabetically arranged entries provide fundamental information about important contemporary and historical topics related to black religious activism Entry bibliographies and a selected, annotated bibliography direct the reader to additional resources


Something Within

Something Within

Author: Fredrick C. Harris

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Published: 1999-08-26

Total Pages: 240

ISBN-13: 0198028210

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One of the first book-length studies in decades solely devoted to religion and African-American political activism, Something Within explores how Afro-Christianity encourages political activism among African-Americans. Combining ethnography, history, contextual analysis, and survey research, this book illustrates the participatory effects of Afro-Christianity by examining its institutional, psychological, and cultural influences. Moving beyond the current debates on the subject, Fredrick C. Harris advances a new theory of religion as a political resource for a "civic culture in opposition."


Black Women’s Christian Activism

Black Women’s Christian Activism

Author: Betty Livingston Adams

Publisher: NYU Press

Published: 2016-02-16

Total Pages: 256

ISBN-13: 0814745466

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2017 Wilbur Non-Fiction Award Recipient Winner of the 2018 Author's Award in scholarly non-fiction, presented by the New Jersey Studies Academic Alliance Winner, 2020 Kornitzer Book Prize, given by Drew University Examines the oft overlooked role of non-elite black women in the growth of northern suburbs and American Protestantism in the first half of the twentieth century When a domestic servant named Violet Johnson moved to the affluent white suburb of Summit, New Jersey in 1897, she became one of just barely a hundred black residents in the town of six thousand. In this avowedly liberal Protestant community, the very definition of “the suburbs” depended on observance of unmarked and fluctuating race and class barriers. But Johnson did not intend to accept the status quo. Establishing a Baptist church a year later, a seemingly moderate act that would have implications far beyond weekly worship, Johnson challenged assumptions of gender and race, advocating for a politics of civic righteousness that would grant African Americans an equal place in a Christian nation. Johnson’s story is powerful, but she was just one among the many working-class activists integral to the budding days of the civil rights movement. Focusing on the strategies and organizational models church women employed in the fight for social justice, Adams tracks the intersections of politics and religion, race and gender, and place and space in a New York City suburb, a local example that offers new insights on northern racial oppression and civil rights protest. As this book makes clear, religion made a key difference in the lives and activism of ordinary black women who lived, worked, and worshiped on the margin during this tumultuous time.


Black Churches and Local Politics

Black Churches and Local Politics

Author: Drew R. Smith

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

Published: 2005-06-30

Total Pages: 244

ISBN-13: 0742571734

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This book on black churches and urban politics uses case studies from various cities to examine the strategies and tactics of activist clergy and congregations. These case studies illustrate how black activist clergy and congregations negotiate the political terrains of their respective cities. The cases show that the political culture of a city—whether that culture is shaped by machine politics, a legacy of political protest, racial and ethnic factionalism, or a city whose power resides in the mayor's office rather than the city council chamber—can influence the tactics of activist clergy and congregations. These cases also show how strategies and tactics vary across congregations as well as within and across cities. Not only do activist churches emphasize political empowerment or economic development, their tactics to pursue their goals may take different forms. They can form coalitions with other churches and/or political organizations, lobby public officials, use personal appeals to persuade politicians, or mobilize voters for candidates who support the congregation's agenda. By taking stock of the strategies that activist black clergy and congregations adopt and the tactics they use to research their goals, the cases in this book highlight nuances in black clergy and church activism that are captured beyond a single case or a focus on national politics. The three sections of Black Churches and Local Politics examine the many ways that black activist clergy and congregations voice their concerns in urban politics. The tactics explored are the use of personal influence by activist ministers, the formation of coalitions with churches and community organizations, and pressure groups that lobby government institutions and leaders on behalf of minority communities.


The Black Church

The Black Church

Author: Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Publisher: Penguin

Published: 2022-01-18

Total Pages: 305

ISBN-13: 1984880357

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The instant New York Times bestseller and companion book to the PBS series. “Absolutely brilliant . . . A necessary and moving work.” —Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., author of Begin Again “Engaging. . . . In Gates’s telling, the Black church shines bright even as the nation itself moves uncertainly through the gloaming, seeking justice on earth—as it is in heaven.” —Jon Meacham, New York Times Book Review From the New York Times bestselling author of Stony the Road and The Black Box, and one of our most important voices on the African American experience, comes a powerful new history of the Black church as a foundation of Black life and a driving force in the larger freedom struggle in America. For the young Henry Louis Gates, Jr., growing up in a small, residentially segregated West Virginia town, the church was a center of gravity—an intimate place where voices rose up in song and neighbors gathered to celebrate life's blessings and offer comfort amid its trials and tribulations. In this tender and expansive reckoning with the meaning of the Black Church in America, Gates takes us on a journey spanning more than five centuries, from the intersection of Christianity and the transatlantic slave trade to today’s political landscape. At road’s end, and after Gates’s distinctive meditation on the churches of his childhood, we emerge with a new understanding of the importance of African American religion to the larger national narrative—as a center of resistance to slavery and white supremacy, as a magnet for political mobilization, as an incubator of musical and oratorical talent that would transform the culture, and as a crucible for working through the Black community’s most critical personal and social issues. In a country that has historically afforded its citizens from the African diaspora tragically few safe spaces, the Black Church has always been more than a sanctuary. This fact was never lost on white supremacists: from the earliest days of slavery, when enslaved people were allowed to worship at all, their meetinghouses were subject to surveillance and destruction. Long after slavery’s formal eradication, church burnings and bombings by anti-Black racists continued, a hallmark of the violent effort to suppress the African American struggle for equality. The past often isn’t even past—Dylann Roof committed his slaughter in the Mother Emanuel AME Church 193 years after it was first burned down by white citizens of Charleston, South Carolina, following a thwarted slave rebellion. But as Gates brilliantly shows, the Black church has never been only one thing. Its story lies at the heart of the Black political struggle, and it has produced many of the Black community’s most notable leaders. At the same time, some churches and denominations have eschewed political engagement and exemplified practices of exclusion and intolerance that have caused polarization and pain. Those tensions remain today, as a rising generation demands freedom and dignity for all within and beyond their communities, regardless of race, sex, or gender. Still, as a source of faith and refuge, spiritual sustenance and struggle against society’s darkest forces, the Black Church has been central, as this enthralling history makes vividly clear.


The Impact of Black Churches on the Civil Rights Movement

The Impact of Black Churches on the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Duchess Harris

Publisher: Core Library

Published: 2019-12-15

Total Pages: 0

ISBN-13: 9781532190780

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"During the civil rights movement, Black churches were places of hope and refuge. Many Black religious leaders were also civil rights activists. [This book] explores the history of Black churches and the roles they played during the civil rights movement"--Amazon.com.


Teaching to Live

Teaching to Live

Author: Almeda M. Wright

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Published: 2024-03-08

Total Pages: 257

ISBN-13: 0197663427

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Teaching to Live explores the connections between religion, education, and struggles for freedom within African American communities throughout the twentieth century by examining the lives of African American activist-educators. Almeda M. Wright interrogates how religion inspired them to educate in radical and transformative ways and invites readers to continue exploring how these concepts will evolve for future generations of activist-educators.


We Testify with Our Lives

We Testify with Our Lives

Author: Terrence L. Johnson

Publisher: Columbia University Press

Published: 2021-08-17

Total Pages: 399

ISBN-13: 0231553625

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Police killings of unarmed Black people have ignited a national and international response unlike any in decades. But differing from their civil rights-oriented predecessors, today’s activists do not think that the institutions and values of liberal democracy can eradicate structural racism. They draw instead on a Black radical tradition that, Terrence L. Johnson argues, derives its force from its unacknowledged ethical and religious dimensions. We Testify with Our Lives traces Black religion’s sustained influence from SNCC to the present, reconstructing a radical lived ethics of freedom and justice. Johnson demonstrates that Black Power fundamentally contests liberalism’s abstract understanding of democracy, calling instead for new embodied frameworks to achieve human flourishing and dignity. Black bodies represent the primary form of resistance against violent and oppressive regimes of white supremacy and exploitation, and the individual and collective struggles of Black life bear witness to the dogged determination to cultivate beauty, rage, and joy. Considering the writings of Audre Lorde, Toni Cade Bambara, Stokely Carmichael, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin, We Testify with Our Lives makes its case through a new narrative of the evolution of Black radicalism from the civil rights movement through the Movement for Black Lives. It forges new insights into Black Power’s vital contributions to debates on ethics, transnational politics, democracy, political solidarity, and freedom—and its potent resources for the ongoing struggle to build democratic possibilities for all.


From Every Mountainside

From Every Mountainside

Author: R. Drew Smith

Publisher: State University of New York Press

Published: 2013-06-27

Total Pages: 385

ISBN-13: 1438447264

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It has become popular to confine discussion of the American civil rights movement to the mid-twentieth-century South. From Every Mountainside contains essays that refuse to bracket the quest for civil rights in this manner, treating the subject as an enduring topic yet to be worked out in American politics and society. Individual essays point to the multiple directions the quest for civil rights has taken, into the North and West, and into policy areas left unresolved since the end of the 1960s, including immigrant and gay rights, health care for the uninsured, and the persistent denials of black voting rights and school equality. In exploring these issues, the volume's contributors shed light on distinctive regional dimensions of African American political and church life that bear in significant ways on both the mobilization of civil rights activism and the achievement of its goals.


A Stone of Hope

A Stone of Hope

Author: David L. Chappell

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

Published: 2009-12-07

Total Pages: 359

ISBN-13: 0807895571

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The civil rights movement was arguably the most successful social movement in American history. In a provocative new assessment of its success, David Chappell argues that the story of civil rights is not a story of the ultimate triumph of liberal ideas after decades of gradual progress. Rather, it is a story of the power of religious tradition. Chappell reconsiders the intellectual roots of civil rights reform, showing how northern liberals' faith in the power of human reason to overcome prejudice was at odds with the movement's goal of immediate change. Even when liberals sincerely wanted change, they recognized that they could not necessarily inspire others to unite and fight for it. But the prophetic tradition of the Old Testament--sometimes translated into secular language--drove African American activists to unprecedented solidarity and self-sacrifice. Martin Luther King Jr., Fannie Lou Hamer, James Lawson, Modjeska Simkins, and other black leaders believed, as the Hebrew prophets believed, that they had to stand apart from society and instigate dramatic changes to force an unwilling world to abandon its sinful ways. Their impassioned campaign to stamp out "the sin of segregation" brought the vitality of a religious revival to their cause. Meanwhile, segregationists found little support within their white southern religious denominations. Although segregationists outvoted and outgunned black integrationists, the segregationists lost, Chappell concludes, largely because they did not have a religious commitment to their cause.