From Willard Straight to Wall Street

From Willard Straight to Wall Street

Author: Thomas W. Jones

Publisher: Cornell University Press

Published: 2019-04-15

Total Pages: 278

ISBN-13: 1501736337

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

In stark and compelling prose, Thomas W. Jones tells his story as a campus revolutionary who led an armed revolt at Cornell University in 1969 and then altered his course over the next fifty years to become a powerful leader in the financial industry including high-level positions at John Hancock, TIAA-CREF and Citigroup as Wall Street plunged into its darkest hour. From Willard Straight to Wall Street provides a front row seat to the author's triumphs and struggles as he was twice investigated by the SEC—and emerged unscathed. His searing perspective as an African American navigating a world dominated by whites reveals a father, a husband, a trusted colleague, a Cornellian, and a business leader who confronts life with an unwavering resolve that defies cliché and offers a unique perspective on the issues of race in America today. The book begins on the steps of Willard Straight Hall where Jones and his classmates staged an occupation for two days that demanded a black studies curriculum at Cornell. The Straight Takeover resulted in the resignation of Cornell President James Perkins with whom Jones reconciled years later. Jones witnessed the destruction of the World Trade Center on 9/11 from his office at ground zero and then observed first-hand the wave of scandals that swept the banking industry over the next decade. From Willard Straight to Wall Street reveals one of the most interesting American stories of the last fifty years.


From Willard Straight to Wall Street

From Willard Straight to Wall Street

Author: Thomas Wade Jones

Publisher:

Published: 2019

Total Pages: 0

ISBN-13: 9781501736322

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

"This is a memoir by Thomas W. Jones, the story of an African American who engaged in one of the most searing and traumatic campus confrontations of the 1960s in 1969 at Cornell University, and then transitioned to being one of the first wave of African Americans attempting to climb the ladder to the top ranks of corporate America. This story will help America to better understand both how far our country has progressed in race relations, and also how far we have yet to go. This story will help the black community to reflect on the dynamics of social and economic divisions within the black community. This story will help Americans of all colors and creeds and ethnicities to have hope for the future of our melting pot democracy"--


Moral Commerce

Moral Commerce

Author: Julie L. Holcomb

Publisher: Cornell University Press

Published: 2016-08-23

Total Pages: 267

ISBN-13: 1501706624

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

How can the simple choice of a men’s suit be a moral statement and a political act? When the suit is made of free-labor wool rather than slave-grown cotton. In Moral Commerce, Julie L. Holcomb traces the genealogy of the boycott of slave labor from its seventeenth-century Quaker origins through its late nineteenth-century decline. In their failures and in their successes, in their resilience and their persistence, antislavery consumers help us understand the possibilities and the limitations of moral commerce. Quaker antislavery rhetoric began with protests against the slave trade before expanding to include boycotts of the use and products of slave labor. For more than one hundred years, British and American abolitionists highlighted consumers’ complicity in sustaining slavery. The boycott of slave labor was the first consumer movement to transcend the boundaries of nation, gender, and race in an effort by reformers to change the conditions of production. The movement attracted a broad cross-section of abolitionists: conservative and radical, Quaker and non-Quaker, male and female, white and black. The men and women who boycotted slave labor created diverse, biracial networks that worked to reorganize the transatlantic economy on an ethical basis. Even when they acted locally, supporters embraced a global vision, mobilizing the boycott as a powerful force that could transform the marketplace. For supporters of the boycott, the abolition of slavery was a step toward a broader goal of a just and humane economy. The boycott failed to overcome the power structures that kept slave labor in place; nonetheless, the movement’s historic successes and failures have important implications for modern consumers.


Tuxedo Park

Tuxedo Park

Author: Jennet Conant

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

Published: 2003

Total Pages: 372

ISBN-13: 0684872889

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

Wall Street legend Alfred Lee Loomis, who once owned Hilton Head Island, was devoted to his hobby of science experiments in his mansion. During World War II, Loomis played a key role in the development of radar and the atomic bomb.


See No Evil

See No Evil

Author: Robert Baer

Publisher: Crown

Published: 2002-01-17

Total Pages: 450

ISBN-13: 1400045983

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

In See No Evil, one of the CIA’s top field officers of the past quarter century recounts his career running agents in the back alleys of the Middle East. In the process, Robert Baer paints a chilling picture of how terrorism works on the inside and provides compelling evidence about how Washington politics sabotaged the CIA’s efforts to root out the world’s deadliest terrorists. On the morning of September 11, 2001, the world witnessed the terrible result of that intelligence failure with the attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. In the wake of those attacks, Americans were left wondering how such an obviously long-term, globally coordinated plot could have escaped detection by the CIA and taken the nation by surprise. Robert Baer was not surprised. A twenty-one-year veteran of the CIA’s Directorate of Operations who had left the agency in 1997, Baer observed firsthand how an increasingly bureaucratic CIA lost its way in the post–cold war world and refused to adequately acknowledge and neutralize the growing threat of Islamic fundamentalist terror in the Middle East and elsewhere. A throwback to the days when CIA operatives got results by getting their hands dirty and running covert operations, Baer spent his career chasing down leads on suspected terrorists in the world’s most volatile hot spots. As he and his agents risked their lives gathering intelligence, he watched as the CIA reduced drastically its operations overseas, failed to put in place people who knew local languages and customs, and rewarded workers who knew how to play the political games of the agency’s suburban Washington headquarters but not how to recruit agents on the ground. See No Evil is not only a candid memoir of the education and disillusionment of an intelligence operative but also an unprecedented look at the roots of modern terrorism. Baer reveals some of the disturbing details he uncovered in his work, including: * In 1996, Osama bin Laden established a strategic alliance with Iran to coordinate terrorist attacks against the United States. * In 1995, the National Security Council intentionally aborted a military coup d’etat against Saddam Hussein, forgoing the last opportunity to get rid of him. * In 1991, the CIA intentionally shut down its operations in Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia, and ignored fundamentalists operating there. When Baer left the agency in 1997 he received the Career Intelligence Medal, with a citation that says, “He repeatedly put himself in personal danger, working the hardest targets, in service to his country.” See No Evil is Baer’s frank assessment of an agency that forgot that “service to country” must transcend politics and is a forceful plea for the CIA to return to its original mission—the preservation of our national sovereignty and the American way of life.


Singing Like Germans

Singing Like Germans

Author: Kira Thurman

Publisher: Cornell University Press

Published: 2021-10-15

Total Pages: 434

ISBN-13: 150175985X

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

In Singing Like Germans, Kira Thurman tells the sweeping story of Black musicians in German-speaking Europe over more than a century. Thurman brings to life the incredible musical interactions and transnational collaborations among people of African descent and white Germans and Austrians. Through this compelling history, she explores how people reinforced or challenged racial identities in the concert hall. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, audiences assumed the categories of Blackness and Germanness were mutually exclusive. Yet on attending a performance of German music by a Black musician, many listeners were surprised to discover that German identity is not a biological marker but something that could be learned, performed, and mastered. While Germans and Austrians located their national identity in music, championing composers such as Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms as national heroes, the performance of their works by Black musicians complicated the public's understanding of who had the right to play them. Audiences wavered between seeing these musicians as the rightful heirs of Austro-German musical culture and dangerous outsiders to it. Thurman explores the tension between the supposedly transcendental powers of classical music and the global conversations that developed about who could perform it. An interdisciplinary and transatlantic history, Singing Like Germans suggests that listening to music is not a passive experience, but an active process where racial and gendered categories are constantly made and unmade.


The Idea Factory

The Idea Factory

Author: Jon Gertner

Publisher: Penguin

Published: 2012-03-15

Total Pages: 432

ISBN-13: 1101561084

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

The definitive history of America’s greatest incubator of innovation and the birthplace of some of the 20th century’s most influential technologies “Filled with colorful characters and inspiring lessons . . . The Idea Factory explores one of the most critical issues of our time: What causes innovation?” —Walter Isaacson, The New York Times Book Review “Compelling . . . Gertner's book offers fascinating evidence for those seeking to understand how a society should best invest its research resources.” —The Wall Street Journal From its beginnings in the 1920s until its demise in the 1980s, Bell Labs-officially, the research and development wing of AT&T-was the biggest, and arguably the best, laboratory for new ideas in the world. From the transistor to the laser, from digital communications to cellular telephony, it's hard to find an aspect of modern life that hasn't been touched by Bell Labs. In The Idea Factory, Jon Gertner traces the origins of some of the twentieth century's most important inventions and delivers a riveting and heretofore untold chapter of American history. At its heart this is a story about the life and work of a small group of brilliant and eccentric men-Mervin Kelly, Bill Shockley, Claude Shannon, John Pierce, and Bill Baker-who spent their careers at Bell Labs. Today, when the drive to invent has become a mantra, Bell Labs offers us a way to enrich our understanding of the challenges and solutions to technological innovation. Here, after all, was where the foundational ideas on the management of innovation were born.


Under the Strain of Color

Under the Strain of Color

Author: Gabriel N. Mendes

Publisher: Cornell University Press

Published: 2015-08-18

Total Pages: 209

ISBN-13: 1501701398

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

In Under the Strain of Color, Gabriel N. Mendes recaptures the history of Harlem's Lafargue Mental Hygiene Clinic, a New York City institution that embodied new ways of thinking about mental health, race, and the substance of citizenship. The result of a collaboration among the psychiatrist and social critic Dr. Fredric Wertham, the writer Richard Wright, and the clergyman Rev. Shelton Hale Bishop, the clinic emerged in the context of a widespread American concern with the mental health of its citizens. Mendes shows the clinic to have been simultaneously a scientific and political gambit, challenging both a racist mental health care system and supposedly color-blind psychiatrists who failed to consider the consequences of oppression in their assessment and treatment of African American patients. Employing the methods of oral history, archival research, textual analysis, and critical race philosophy, Under the Strain of Color contributes to a growing body of scholarship that highlights the interlocking relationships among biomedicine, institutional racism, structural violence, and community health activism.


Seven Pleasures

Seven Pleasures

Author: Willard Spiegelman

Publisher: Macmillan

Published: 2009-04-27

Total Pages: 207

ISBN-13: 0374239304

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

Spiegelman takes a look at the possibilities for achieving ordinary happiness without recourse to either religion or drugs. In this erudite and frequently hilarious book of essays, he discusses seven activities that lead naturally and easily to a sense of well-being.


Walworth Street to Wall Street

Walworth Street to Wall Street

Author: Pasquale "Pat" Scida

Publisher: Christian Faith Publishing, Inc.

Published: 2019-08-30

Total Pages: 426

ISBN-13: 1644587815

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

In December 1968, auto body repairman, Pasquale "Pat" Scida, age 24, son of Italian immigrants and Brooklyn native, secured an $85 a week entry level position on Wall Street. His memoir, "Walworth Street to Wall Street" How an $85 a Week Clerk became a $100 Million Investment Banker," documents a 13-year journey from clerk to Vice President, managing weekly sales of $50 Million of Fixed Income Securities. "Walworth Street (where the author lived until age seventeen) to Wall Street" is a review of the work of Wall Street and a chronicle of its troubles during the years 1968-1981. Readers accompany the author through various firms; Eastman Dillon, Charles Plohn & Co., Reynolds Securities, and Dean Witter Reylolds; through jobs, departments and divisions of firms. Early stages will interest Operations, Fixed Income and Municipal Bond operatives. Financial industry executive(s) and middle management past and present, will gravitate to the descriptions of toppling firms and the merger and acquisition of others, including portraits of their legendary executives. Further, the author describes his and his colleagues roll in "a vast movement of capital from the nation's banks to its brokerage firms," stemming from the runaway inflation and interest rates of the late seventies and early eighties. For investors, the author deciphers, the transactional and market trade, new issue and secondary market pricing, brokerage firm profitability, product development and more. Set against a series of momentous political and economic events, The Arab Oil Embargo, The Iran Hostage Crisis, The NYC Fiscal Collapse, The WHUPPS debacle and The Vietnam War; "Walworth Street to Wall Street" is a fast-paced account of the making of a Wall Street career, during a period of real time events that shook the financial community and the nation. If you like Wall Street, you're going to love "Walworth Street to Wall Street."